The 9 Biggest Drywall Installation Mistakes

Drywall installation mistakes can be costly and require purchasing new materials. If you are a first time drywall installer, or a DIY expert, our top nine biggest drywall installation mistakes will refresh your mind on what to avoid and how to fix any mistakes that may occur on the job.  

1. Over Screwing Drywall

Screwing more than required is one of the most common drywall installation mistakes. Overscrewing causes damage to the surface of the board, which loosens the hold the screw has on the drywall sheet. If overscrewing is an issue, you can quickly remedy this by placing a screw near the one that is overscrewed.

2. Oversanding Drywall

A common mistake that occurs while installing drywall that happens too often is oversanding. Before sanding, take caution and do not be aggressive when sanding, and doing so will lead to oversanding and damaging the seam. It is ideal to have a light shining where you are sanding to get the best visual while working.

3. Improper Frame Support

When fastening drywall to the frame, many may forget to incorporate added backing to support drywall hanging. Novices will screw to the inside corners leading to weaker support causing damage and improper drywall installation. If you do not have adequate support, add an additional 2×4 alongside the initial frame.

4. Incorrect Alignment

The only thing worse than incorrect alignment is incorrect fastening. A skilled tradesman always thinks of the rule of cutting and applies it when needed, measure twice, cut once. If we use this to the craft of drywall installation, you can say measure twice and drill. It doesn’t have the same ring to it per se; however, marking the spots where you need to screw to install the drywall into the frame is essential. Otherwise, you may miss the frame and need to screw in the same area more than once.

5. Incorrect Fastening

The only thing worse than incorrect alignment is incorrect fastening. A skilled tradesman always thinks of the rule of cutting and applies it when needed, measure twice, cut once. If we use this to the craft of drywall installation, you can say measure twice and drill. It doesn’t have the same ring to it per se; however, marking the spots where you need to screw to install the drywall into the frame is essential. Otherwise, you may miss the frame and need to screw in the same area more than once.

6. Create Tight Drywall Joints

Keeping the joints between sheets of drywall too close is an invitation for troubles along the way. Professional drywall installers allow for ⅛-inch space between sheetrock placement, and this allows for expansion and contraction for the frame of the building, avoiding cracks and damage to the drywall. Remember, it is easier to fill a gap than cut and repair broken drywall.

7. Misaligning Holes For Electrical Boxes

One of the trickiest parts of installing drywall is making sure there is room for electrical boxes. Measure your markings and cut carefully. Once you are done cutting, hold up your drywall and see if the electrical box fits the opening. If the drywall sheet fits, screw the opposite end of where the electrical box is. If the fit looks tight, use a utility knife to cut away drywall until the box fits and slide it over. Once that is done, finish screwing in the wall.

8. Using Tapered Edges on Outside Corners

An easy-to-miss mistake is that the installer will leave the tapered edge facing outward while hanging drywall with an outside edge. This will make installing a corner bead much more difficult since it is rounded. Need to have cut edges along the outside corner. You do not want a tapered edge at the corner as it will be challenging to bead.

9. Create Unnecessary Joints

Inexperienced drywall installers and DIYers may want to cheap out and purchase the least amount of materials for the job. While this may seem wise initially, you’ll end up spending more time and money trying to cut costs. Consider how many sheets it will take to cover a wall. If you can cover a wall with two 12-foot long sheets over four eight-foot long sheets, opt for fewer sheets. While 12-foot long sheets may be more challenging to move and adjust, it makes it easier in the long run when taping and applying coats of compound.

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